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MAGCUL マグカル

MAGCUL(MAGNET+CULTURE)
the media for art, culture and events in Kanagawa prefecture.
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ニッポンの発展を支えた、うんこと便所の歴史をたどる!
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2020.03.18

Follow the history of yeah and toilets that supported the development of Japan!

Nihon Minka-en, Kawasaki / Japan Open-air Folk House Museum 
(Please note that this page was created using Google's automatic translation service and understand that because of this, its translation may not necessarily be accurate.)

The world of art that you can go, see, and feel
File.26 Kawasaki Municipal Nihon Minka-en, "shit and life - from the toilet to fertilize -"
Miyuki Inoue (Magcal editorial department)

Kawasaki Municipal Japanese Folk House Garden in Ikuta Ryokuchi is an open-air museum with a total of 25 old folk houses, including 7 nationally designated important cultural properties, on a spacious site of about 30,000 square meters. The lush green garden where you can enjoy the flowers of the four seasons is perfect for going out with your lunch.
In such a peaceful landscape, a fairly unique exhibition is being held.
The title is "Yeah and Living-From Toilet to Fertilizer-".
What a fastball title. I have to go for this!

Follow the history of yeah and toilets that supported the development of Japan!

If you buy a ticket at the entrance of the main gate, first visit the exhibition room of the main building.
The exhibition consists of four chapters, starting with the introduction of various tools used in the "toilet" that is indispensable to our daily lives, and displaying in an easy-to-understand manner how "human waste" has been used or processed. ing.

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In the title, "Unko" is the leading role, but first from the "Urinal" collection.
The chubby form is cute and the colors are colorful. The rakugo story "Urin" is a story that began when a samurai who visited an antique shop thought that it was a vase and bought it, but it seems to be really possible.
Follow the history of yeah and toilets that supported the development of Japan!

This is a urinal and footrest for men. It should be called "beauty for use", and even if it fits in the display case, it doesn't feel strangely strange.
The history of using stool as fertilizer and the fact that Kawasaki City was the first to use a vacuum car in Japan are also introduced. It's a compact exhibition, but when you take a closer look, it's surprisingly deep.

Follow the history of yeah and toilets that supported the development of Japan!

After learning the whole process from the toilet to fertilizer, let's do a field survey at an old folk house in the park while looking at the "Obenjo Map".
First of all, from the horse inn (hatago) "Suzuki Family Residence" on the Oshu Kaido.

Follow the history of yeah and toilets that supported the development of Japan!

This is a toilet next to the guest room, and it seems that it was mainly used by guests. The inside is divided into a toilet and a urine.

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Next is the "Sasaki Family Residence" in Shinshu.
The urine next to the entrance (on the far right in the photo) is for families. It's mainly for men, but when there's no one, it's also used by women, so it feels easygoing. It seems that the stool was in another hut.

Follow the history of yeah and toilets that supported the development of Japan!

Since the Sasaki family was a village head, they had a toilet for customers to welcome guests such as officials. It's usually closed because it's in the back of the room, but this time it's open to the public from the back.

Follow the history of yeah and toilets that supported the development of Japan!

There is a tatami mat.
At that time, even the village head did not use tatami mats in his daily life, so it must be a fairly high-class toilet.

Follow the history of yeah and toilets that supported the development of Japan!

The gassho-style "Yamada Family Residence" has a gassho-style toilet!
The small hut in the foreground is a toilet called "Henchagoya". It doubles as a fertilizer hut, and is connected to the main building by a covered bridge.

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"Sakuda Family Residence" was a net source for seine fishing at Kujukuri Beach in Chiba Prefecture.

Follow the history of yeah and toilets that supported the development of Japan!

It is a toilet for visitors, with a urinal in the foreground and a urinal in the back.
Even though no one is using it, it feels strange to "peek" at the toilet.

Follow the history of yeah and toilets that supported the development of Japan!

This is the urine in the foreground. From the current sense, it may be quite wide.

Follow the history of yeah and toilets that supported the development of Japan!

This is the toilet in the back.
It may be new to little children, but this shape was common until Western-style toilets became widespread.

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The "Kitamura Family Residence", which was relocated from Hadano City, Kanagawa Prefecture, is the home of a farmer who was the owner and cultivated tobacco leaves.

Follow the history of yeah and toilets that supported the development of Japan!

The family urine is on the side of the entrance like the Sasaki family.
It seems that the toilet was in another hut, but the Kitamura family said that the house wouldn't prosper if the toilet was dirty, and the children were cleaning the toilet every morning.

Follow the history of yeah and toilets that supported the development of Japan!

Next is the outhouse of the Koizumi family in Kawasaki City, Kanagawa Prefecture. It was on the back of the main building, and it was surrounded by hedges so that it could not be seen from the outside.
The right is for stool and the left is for urine. The stools collected in the stool pot were transferred to a fermenter, fermented for 2 to 3 months, and then used as compost in the field. In the sense that it was indispensable for the cultivation of crops, there is no doubt that compost made from stools contributed to the development of Japanese society.

Follow the history of yeah and toilets that supported the development of Japan!

If you look at the "Agricultural Tool Hut Exhibition Room" next to it, you can see the buckets and other items on display.
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The last is the toilet of the nationally designated important cultural property "Kudo Family Residence" that was relocated from Iwate Prefecture. It's a large building for a toilet, but it also serves as a storeroom, and it seems that it also had various ash used as fertilizer.

Follow the history of yeah and toilets that supported the development of Japan!

The inside looks like this. It has a simple structure with two boards passed over a "stool pot" that collects stool. You can ride on the board here, so you can enjoy the feeling of the past by straddling the acupuncture points.
However, please note that it is NG to actually use it.

Follow the history of yeah and toilets that supported the development of Japan!

"Of course, there is a toilet in an old folk house. It was popular with children, so I wanted to hold a special exhibition that mainly dealt with it someday. It was a great opportunity, so the whereabouts of what came out of the toilet Please think about it. "
And Rina Tamai, a curator.

The stools collected from the toilet were once effectively used as a nutritious "fertilizer" for growing vegetables. It is natural that the way toilets should be changed with urbanization. However, stools always occur as long as human beings are alive. With this special exhibition as a trigger, I would like to think about "beyond" rather than the end when excreting.

This event has ended.
《Yeah and living-from the toilet to fertilizer》
[Session] Until May 31, 2020 (Sun)
[Time] 9:30 to 17:00
[Place] Kawasaki Municipal Japanese Folk House Main Building Exhibition Room
[Fee] Free (admission required)

  • Nihon Minka-en, Kawasaki / Japan Open-air Folk House Museum
  • Nihon Minka-en, Kawasaki / Japan Open-air Folk House Museum
  • Nihon Minka-en, Kawasaki / Japan Open-air Folk House Museum
  • Nihon Minka-en, Kawasaki / Japan Open-air Folk House Museum

This open-air museum hosts a collection of 25 traditional buildings, mostly from the Edo period (1603 - 1868). They were relocated to the museum from around the country. Every building has been designated a Cultural Property, and they house displays of agricultural equipment and folk tools used in the home. You'll feel you've slipped back in time while enjoying the seasons, including springtime cheery blossoms and autumn leaves. The folk houses host storytelling, performing arts, and lots of other events, as well as a variety of hands-on programs. You can learn about the buildings at an exhibition in the main hall, where they hold planned exhibits too. Their Traditional Craft Hall is open for everyone to experience old-fashioned indigo dyeing.

  • Address
    7-1-1 Masugata, Tama-ku, Kawasaki-shi, Kanagawa
  • TEL
    044-922-2181
  • Business Hour
    March-October 9: 30-17: 00 / November-February 9: 30-16: 30 Closed: Mondays (open on public holidays), the day after public holidays (open on Saturdays, Sundays, and public holidays) ), Year-end and New Year holidays (12 / 29-1 / 3), with temporary holidays
  • Parking Area
    140 cars (Ikuta Ryokuchi East Exit Parking Lot)
  • Reserve
    Reservations are required for groups (20 or more). Reservation recommended for indigo dyeing experience.
  • Average Usage
    [Admission fee] General 500 yen, high school / university students / 65 years old or older 300 yen (certificate required), junior high school students or younger / Kawasaki city resident 65 years old or older free (certificate required) * Group fee available

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